The beaches here are located along the street of the same name, as well as, the Memorial  411 Battery.


A BIT OF HISTORY…

Strangely enough, the history of Dacha Kovalevsky is connected with the history of the Odessa water supply system and, as you will see later in the story, is rather tragic. But, everything is in order….

Odessa, since its foundation and in the first decades of its rapid development, has been seriously confronted with the problem of water supply. In those days, Odessans were forced to collect rainwater to meet their needs. However, in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, three settlements formed on the coast, south-west of what was then Odessa, in the hamlet. Their occurrence is due to the fact that abundant sources of drinking water were located in these places. Odessans called such sources the French word “fountain” (“fontaine”). Accordingly, the farms began to be called the Big Fountain, the Middle Fountain and the Small Fountain. All three Fountains became the main sources of water for Odessa at that time. Later, for the delivery of water, from the farms to the city began to ply the railway equestrian train with several cars, and the farms themselves began to be called “stations”. Further, horse-drawn wheel barrels were transported through the city. Agree, the system is quite cumbersome and time consuming. The problem could solve only the plumbing….

One of those who tried to solve this problem was the French émigré Stephen Pichon. However, this large-scale task was not solved, and a rich merchant from Taganrog, Timofey Kovalevsky, who in the late 40s of the 19th century at the Big Fountain Station built an underground stone water intake gallery, steam pump station, water tower with a height of 45 meters and water supply 12 kilometers long. Water was supplied to the intersection of the current Staroportofrankovskaya and Bolshaya Arnautskaya streets. It was there that the reservoir was installed (a large metal tank), from which water was transported by horse-drawn water carriers around the city. The first water supply by water pipe took place on February 15, 1853. This day can be considered the birthday of Odessa water pipeline…

For services to the city, Kovalevsky was awarded the title of Honorary Citizen of Odessa, which was passed on to his descendants through the male line. Next to the water tower, the Kovalevsky family built a house for themselves.

However, the amount of water in the springs of the Fountains gradually dried up, and the Kovalevsky enterprise fell into decay …. Significant debts brought the creator of the Odessa water pipeline to suicide: in the late 60s of the 19th century, Kovalevsky rushed from the water tower he had built. Attempts by his eldest son, Andrei Kovalevsky, to restore matters did not succeed, and in 1873, to meet the growing water needs of the city, they began to pump water from the Belyaevskaya water pumping station from the Dniester River. It was noticeably worse than spring water from the Kovalevsky water supply system, and Odessans began to say about its quality, that it was “not a fountain”. Thus, the characteristic of the low quality of something popular nowadays in Odessa was born – “this is not a fountain”…

After the seizure of Odessa in 1920 by units of the Red Army, the descendants of Timofey Kovalevsky emigrated abroad. In the 30s of the last century, the water tower was dismantled, since the USSR believed that it could be a good reference point for sighting enemy artillery during possible hostilities.

So ended the history of the first Odessa water pipeline, but the area where the first water supply station and street along the Black Sea coast was located, and later, the coast itself, with time, became known as the Cottage Kovalevsky.


The coast near the Kovalevsky Dacha is a unique place … This is the area of the so-called Odessa fishing “kuren”, which are small dachas of amateur fishermen. Almost every owner of such a cabin has at least one fishing boat. These smoking cottages stretch along the coast, practically, up to the Black Sea and are divided into “moorings”. Today, many “smokers” have lost their original purpose – their owners rent their guests to the city for the summer season…